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March 25, 2018

Katy Perry Gets Filler Injected Under Her Eyes to Banish Dark Circles

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Dark under eye circles are among the top beauty concerns many women h
ave—and one of the hardest to treat. No matter how many hours of sleep you may have gotten, those pesky dark hollows can make it appear like you haven't gotten a wink in weeks. Even celebs struggle with them!

In a recent interview with Refinery29, Katy Perry opened up about rumors circulating regarding her getting plastic surgery.While she denies having any surgical work done, she happily admits to getting under eye filler injections to treat her dark circles. "I've done lasers and got [filler] injections under my eyes for the hollowing—which I'd recommend for everyone who wants a solution for their dark circles," she told the website.

We got the scoop from a dermatologist and plastic surgeon on whether this is a viable option for everyone.

"Filler under the eyes can do wonders for patients who have a hollow," says Dara Liotta, MD, a plastic surgeon based in New York City. It can help smooth out the under eye and plump up the skin where it's concave, she explains. That hollowness is the real problem because it creates shadow that can’t be covered with concealer. If you suffer from genetic dark circles, but lack that depth, it's easier to hide with cosmetics.

Mona Gohara, MD, associate clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine, agrees, adding that "by subtly lifting the skin and plumping it, it reduces the darker discoloration."

So, yes, in theory fillers are a great option for those who have struggled with dark circles because of a trough under their eyes, but they're not a cure-all. Before you run out and heed Perry's advice, it's important to note that not everyone is a candidate for this treatment.

"Under eye filler won't help patients with darkened, pigmented areas under the eyes, or eye puffiness alone," cautions Dr. Liotta. "in fact, it can make puffiness look worse." She recommends getting a consultation with a board-certified physician before making any decisions.

It's also important to keep in mind that this area is one of the most dangerous to get injectied. "You need to go to someone who understands the anatomy of the face," warns Dr. Gohara, such as a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon. "The result of a shoddy injector who accidentally hits a vessel can lead to blindness, so proceed with caution."

Not ready to make the leap like Perry did? Dr. Gohara recommends SkinMedica TNS Illuminating Eye Cream ($92; dermstore.com) "because it contains antioxidants and growth factors that can help to prevent further discoloration." It's one of my favorites, too. I'm also a fan of Sunday Riley's newest eye cream, Auto Correct ($65; sephora.com). A good under eye cream can do wonders for dark circles, as well as fine lines and dry skin, no needles necessary.

Slideshow: 12 foods for stronger nails and thicker hair (Provided by Health.com)

Slide 1 of 13: <p>Looking good is just as much about taking care of your body on the inside as it is about using products on the outside. And we're not just talking about your skin: "A nutritious diet promotes healthy nails and hair, too," says <a href="http://www.zeichnerdermatology.com">Joshua Zeichner, MD</a>, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But there's no need to add a refrigerator's worth of new foods to your diet. "Since both hair and nails are made of keratin, through a similar process in the body, it's thought that nutrients that help one can also help the other," says Dr. Zeichner. Ready to say bye-bye to brittleness? Read on for foods that will help you achieve thicker hair and healthy nails.</p> <p> <b>Watch the video:</b> <a href="http://www.health.com/health/video/0,,20836517,00.html">6 Foods for Beautiful Skin and Hair</a></p>

Slide 2 of 13: <p>"Your hair needs protein to produce keratin, the proteins that make hair strong," says Dr. Zeichner. "If hair doesn't receive enough protein, it can go into a 'resting phase,' causing noticeable hair loss," adds Beth Warren, author of Living a Real Life with Real Food. Try adding a scoop of whey protein to your morning smoothie for simple boost. (Bonus: Whey protein may help <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20823408,00.html">control your appetite</a>. In one study, people who drank whey protein ate 18% less two hours later than those who drank a carb-heavy beverage.)</p>

Slide 3 of 13: <p>A juicy steak is loaded with protein, and it also has another nutrient that's important for hair and nail health: iron. "People with iron-deficiency anemia often have thin hair," says Dr. Zeichner. And according the American Family Physician, iron-deficiency is associated with koilonychia—a nail disease characterized by spoon-shaped nails. That doesn't mean you should eat red meat every day of the week. Red meat is high in saturated fat, and eating a lot of it has been associated with an increased risk of several health problems including heart disease, several types of cancer, and type 2 diabetes. But you can safely indulge in a lean cut of beef once a week. If you think you may be deficient in iron, talk to your doctor about starting a supplement.</p> <p> <b>Related: <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20798655,00.html">15 Signs You May Have an Iron Deficiency</a></b></p>

Slide 4 of 13: <p>"Antioxidants help protect your body's cells against free radical damage," says <a href="http://www.erinpalinski.com">Erin Palinski, RD</a>, author of Belly Fat Diet For Dummies. "This damage increases stress hormones and inflammation, which impacts all cells in the body, including those in the hair and nails." Among other fruits and dark greens, Palinski calls out blueberries: "They have one of the highest antioxidant properties of all fruits," she says.</p>

Slide 5 of 13: <p>Not only are almonds a good source of protein, they're loaded with magnesium, which helps maintain healthy hair and nails. "Magnesium is Mother Nature's anti-stress mineral, and stress is a major factor in hair loss," explains <a href="http://www.ashleykoffapproved.com">Ashley Koff, RD</a>. "Vertical ridges in your nails may be a sign of inadequate <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20660118_14,00.html">magnesium</a>," adds Palinski. You can also get more magnesium through leafy greens, cacao nibs, and soybeans.</p>

Slide 6 of 13: <p>Beer is one of the <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20355113">richest sources of silicon in the average diet</a>, says research from the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. "Silicon is a trace mineral thought to increase circulation to the scalp, which is good news for hair growth," says Rebecca Kazin, MD, dermatologist at the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and the Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology. That explains why a daily <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16205932">10-milligram silicon supplement</a> was shown to reduce hair and nail brittleness after 20 weeks, according to the Archives of Dermatological Research. No need to go overboard, though: Most single servings of beer contain more than 10 milligrams of silicon. Experts recommend that having no more than one drink a day if you're a woman, and two if you're a man.</p>

Slide 7 of 13: <p>"Zinc is needed for many biological processes, including making proteins like those in your hair and nails," explains Dr. Zeichner. <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20660118_21,00.html">Oysters have 74 grams of zinc per serving</a>, far more than any other food, says the National Institutes of Health. Not lucky enough to eat oysters every day? Beef, poultry, fortified cereals, and baked beans can also help you up your intake.</p>

Slide 8 of 13: <p>More research still needs to be done, but some studies suggest a link between vitamin D and hair loss. Example: Women with hair shedding had <a href="http://news.health.com/2014/07/22/5-things-you-need-to-know-about-vitamin-d-deficiency/">lower vitamin D levels</a> than women with healthy hair, according to a Skin Pharmacology Physiology study. Plus, Koff says calcium is a key mineral in building healthy hair and nails (note: you need vitamin D to absorb calcium). Of course, vitamin-D fortified milk offers both, but speak to your doctor about a vitamin D supplement if you think you might be deficient.</p>

Slide 9 of 13: <p>Eggs are a good source of protein and contain some vitamin D, and they also have biotin. "Biotin, a B-complex vitamin, may play a role in the development of keratin," says Dr. Zeichner, who explains that patients with biotin deficiency often have weak hair and nails.</p> <p> Note: If you have a major nail concerns, you may want to consider a biotin supplement. A daily dose of 2.5 milligrams <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17763607">may strengthen brittle nails</a>, says a Journal of Drugs in Dermatology review, and that's too much to get from food (you'd need to eat over 300 eggs, in fact).</p>

Slide 10 of 13: <p>Salmon is a good source of biotin and protein, along with omega-3 fatty acids, which reduce inflammation, and promote healthy, moisturized skin. And don't forget, your scalp is skin, too: "A healthy scalp means healthy hair follicles, which mean healthy hair," says Dr. Zeichner. Omega-3s' inflammation-reducing effects are also good for your nails: "Inflammation impairs the healthy development of your nail plate," says Dr. Kazin.</p>

Slide 11 of 13: <p>Rats deficient in selenium (a trace element linked to protection against oxidative stress) have sparse hair growth, says a study in PLoS One. Just six to eight Brazil nuts meet almost 800% of your recommended daily value, according to the National Institutes of Health.</p>

Slide 12 of 13: <p>To keep your strands strong and luscious, snack on some <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20585485_4,00.html">walnuts</a>. They are chock-full of two secret ingredients for gorgeous locks: omega-3s (which keep your hair hydrated) and vitamin E (which repair damaged follicles. Plus, walnuts also contain copper, which studies have shown may keep your natural color rich and stave or premature grayness.</p>

Slide 13 of 13: <p>Eating coconut oil may not may not magically transform your mane, but applying this food directly to your hair could actually do wonders. That’s because it contains proteins that are essential to revitalize damaged hair. Try rubbing a pea sized amount of oil between your fingers and then applying it to the ends of your hair or halfway down your strands, to keep it shiny and frizz-free. Or use it for a DIY <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20855271,00.html/view-all#hair-mask-0">hair mask</a> or <a href="http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20855271,00.html/view-all#cuticle-softener-0">cuticle softener</a>.</p>
Slide 1 of 13: <p>Looking good is just as much about taking care of your body on the inside as it is about using products on the outside. And we're not just talking about your skin: "A nutritious diet promotes healthy nails and hair, too," says <a href="http://www.zeichnerdermatology.com">Joshua Zeichner, MD</a>, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But there's no need to add a refrigerator's worth of new foods to your diet. "Since both hair and nails are made of keratin, through a similar process in the body, it's thought that nutrients that help one can also help the other," says Dr. Zeichner. Ready to say bye-bye to brittleness? Read on for foods that will help you achieve thicker hair and healthy nails.</p> <p> <b>Watch the video:</b> <a href="http://www.health.com/health/video/0,,20836517,00.html">6 Foods for Beautiful Skin and Hair</a></p>
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HOW TO MAKE YOUR HAIR THICKER AND NAILS STRONGER
Looking good is just as much about taking care of your body on the inside as it is about using products on the outside. And we're not just talking about your skin: "A nutritious diet promotes healthy nails and hair, too," says Joshua Zeichner, MD, director of cosmetic and clinical research in the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. But there's no need to add a refrigerator's worth of new foods to your diet. "Since both hair and nails are made of keratin, through a similar process in the body, it's thought that nutrients that help one can also help the other," says Dr. Zeichner. Ready to say bye-bye to brittleness? Read on for foods that will help you achieve thicker hair and healthy nails.
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